Tradition Inherited – Friday Fictioneers

Title: Tradition Inherited
Source:  Friday Fictioneers sponsored by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields-Addicted to Purple
Word count: 100 words

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PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Anna didn’t remember ever hearing the story of how it started. As a child, she thought it a silly tradition. They insisted they attend every family gathering. But the years passed, and she now found herself installed as the de facto caretaker.

She sat and stared at the six gold-rimmed glass roses. One for each child. The white rose, the diamond, represented the oldest child, her mother.

After grandma passed the bouquet became mother’s inheritance, her duty to keep them together.

Anna’s finger traced the gold outline of a white petal and feared she would never fill her mother’s shoes.

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

After the Storm

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Outside the storm raged through the night. Icy tendrils swept down the chimney, teasing feeble flames which were the only source of heat for the occupants of the house. With covers pulled tight, they huddled in their beds, feigning sleep as the storm buffeted the house.

Riordan listened as the winds died and a faint gray light seeped through the windows. The rooster’s crow alerted the household of dawn’s arrival. Riordan didn’t wait, he threw back the covers and hurried to dress in the chilly room. Downstairs, he pulled on his boots, coat, and fingerless gloves, then jammed his hat on his head. His easel and a stash of canvas rested by the door, ready for the day’s adventure.

He opened the door to discover a world of stark contrasts. The storm had erased the normal colors, rendering them in shades of gray, accentuated by black shadows and pristine-white snow. Riordan surveyed his new world and considered his options. The pond, already frozen over before the storm would resemble any snow-covered field, he reasoned. He wanted to capture the subtle textures and the muted tones. He knew where he wanted to go.

With his easel and a large canvas tucked up under his arm he plowed into the snowdrift and headed toward the road leading into town. As he trudged through knee-deep drifts, he reminded himself to look at the landscape and consider possible compositions for their artistic values. After walking a mile, he decided on his scene. The Olsen’s white farmhouse lay outlined by the dark tree-lined ridge behind it. Clouds, still heavy with snow, filtered the sunlight that fell on Lookout Peak in the distance.

The Olsen’s barns and other outbuildings helped to give the scene movement and a single tall pine framed the composition. Riordan juggled the canvas as he opened the easel and stuck it in the snow. With the easel situated he placed the canvas on the supports, pulled his pallet free and opened paint tubes. Dabs of Payne’s Gray, Mars Black, Prussian Blue, Sap Green, Titanium White, Raw Sienna, and Cadmium Red soon lay arranged on his pallet.  He needed to work fast before the light changed.

Riordan selected his largest brush and blocked in color. His brush swiped across the canvas, his body swayed with the movement and he lost himself to the process.

He wasn’t sure how much time had passed when he noticed the brush slipping from his freezing fingertips. Laying the pallet aside he blew on his hands, warming them before getting back to work. But now his work slowed, he paused more frequently to warm his fingers, and he noticed the cold, as it nipped his nose and seeped into his boots.

Just one more brush stroke he told himself again and again. That shadow needs more blue, and the barn more red, he thought as he tried to ignore the discomfort. At last, he shivered and knew he must stop. Riordan hated to admit defeat against the elements. He stared at the scene attempting to commit each color change, every shadow, each fleck of light to memory before he packed up his gear. He handled his canvas, his day’s masterpiece, with care as he retraced his steps and headed home.

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

2019 Daily Writing Challenge February 20

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Today Is Day 51 of the 2019 Daily Writing Challenge.

Did you write yesterday? Let us know your Day 50 word count in the comments.

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What is the 2019 Daily Writing Challenge? It is simple: Write something every day.

Write a little, write a lot. Just write. You have all day.

It doesn’t matter if you write 5 words, 5,000 words or something in between. The idea is to establish a daily writing habit. If you miss a day, don’t worry. Write today and report tomorrow on your success.

A great journey begins with one step. A great writing habit begins with one word. Go!

Check back tomorrow for the Day 51 Report and let us know how you did.

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

Daily Quote

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I started my writing journey to tell the stories that were cluttering my head. Stories float and flit through my mind as numerous as fireflies on a summer’s night. But I shared Tony’s concern. Would there come a time when I ran short of ideas? Where would I get new ideas? How could I continue writing if the well ran dry?

Despite my fear, I write stories, flash fiction stories, short stories, and novels. I started with ideas for two novels and now have ideas in various stages of development for four novels. Writing stories is like cutting the head off a Hydra. Each story I write creates more story ideas, and my idea list grows exponentially longer.

Does your writing inspire more stories?

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

Invocations – #MenageMonday!

Title: Invocations
Source:  #MenageMonday! Challenge Week 2×21
Word count: 250 words

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Source: Dreamstime

Breathless, Sandu entered the sanctuary, slamming the door behind her. Staggering forward, her trembling hand grasped the taper, and she closed her eyes while she recited the invocation, then lit a candle. Safe now, she replaced the taper and entered the nave. Silent gods greeted her, easing her tension.

A commotion behind the alter snapped her back to high alert, as the monster materialized, stumbling toward her. Its weapon aimed at her chest, it paused at the end of the aisle.

The hideous beast flickered, phasing between two forms. Its tortured scream echoed in the nave’s vastness and Sandu recognized Doron’s contorted face as he fought to control the monster.

“Sandu. Help me,” his voice, half monster, half Doron, growled at her.

Sandu ran to him, grabbing the weapon, she tossed it behind her. Doron collapsed against her, his weight dragging them to the floor. She cradled Doron as the visage of the monster seeped away.

“They must be rescued.”

“From the Kalaraja? That’s impossible,” she said.

“No, Sandu. There is a way. I’m proof.”

“Proof? Doron?” Sandu’s voice trailed off, refusing to say what they both knew. Doron clutched her hand gripping it with all his remaining strength and stared at her.

“It’s in you,” he said as his grip weakened, “You can help me escape.”

Sandu lowered her head, begging the gods to save him. Words she had never heard collected in her throat and flowed from her lips. The sanctuary glowed crimson, flickering gold, and Doron smiled.

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

Daily Quote

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I enjoy writing flash fiction and short stories. Attempting to write a story with a beginning a middle and an end in 100 words, is a real challenge. Every word must pull its weight, helping to develop the setting, mood, plot, character arc and everything else that makes a story successful. Concise, compact writing is the order of the day.

Like William, I use my daily flash fiction to try new things, explore the art of storytelling, test genres and have fun. I take the germ of the idea, write freely, then edit, edit, edit. I spend more time editing than I do writing the piece. Once my warm-up flash fiction is complete, I can start the days writing goals.

How do you structure your writing day?

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

2019 Daily Writing Challenge February 19

2019-daily-writing-challenge-day-49

Today Is Day 50 of the 2019 Daily Writing Challenge.

Did you write yesterday? Let us know your Day 49 word count in the comments.

———————

What is the 2019 Daily Writing Challenge? It is simple: Write something every day.

Write a little, write a lot. Just write. You have all day.

It doesn’t matter if you write 5 words, 5,000 words or something in between. The idea is to establish a daily writing habit. If you miss a day, don’t worry. Write today and report tomorrow on your success.

A great journey begins with one step. A great writing habit begins with one word. Go!

Check back tomorrow for the Day 50 Report and let us know how you did.

_________________________________________

Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

Daily Quote

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I have learned I am not a morning person.  Early morning quiet, the new day’s stirrings, the first bird calls, the gradual coloration of the night’s black sky is my favorite time of day. I don’t attempt to string conscience thoughts into meaningful prose. It is too tortuous. Ideally, those early hours are better left to strong coffee and morning chores. It is also time for my morning characters meetings which is often a melee of conversational snippets, random impressions, and implausible situations.

With morning chores done, I have a primed pump, and I can spend several hours writing, transcribing the morning’s words and ideas. I take a break, waiting for my second wind, sometime around 9 or 10 pm., and I work until midnight.

When is your best writing time?

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

2019 Daily Writing Challenge February 18

2019-daily-writing-challenge-day-48

Today Is Day 49 of the 2019 Daily Writing Challenge.

Did you write yesterday? Let us know your Day 48 word count in the comments.

———————

What is the 2019 Daily Writing Challenge? It is simple: Write something every day.

Write a little, write a lot. Just write. You have all day.

It doesn’t matter if you write 5 words, 5,000 words or something in between. The idea is to establish a daily writing habit. If you miss a day, don’t worry. Write today and report tomorrow on your success.

A great journey begins with one step. A great writing habit begins with one word. Go!

Check back tomorrow for the Day 49 Report and let us know how you did.

_________________________________________

Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

The Reward – 100 Word Wednesday

Title: The Reward
Source:  100 Word Wednesday: Week 107
Word count: 100 words

Photo by Bikurgurl

Allie shifted, tired of waiting and watching she rubbed her neck and surveyed her immediate area. Maybe the intelligence was wrong. She glanced at her wrist then refocused her sights to the bridge’s far end. Fifteen minutes past the appointed time stretched to half past the hour.

“Any movement?” the voice in her ear ask.

“Negative,” she whispered.

“Should we abort?”

Stifling a groan, she felt the muscle in her temple throbbed.

“Negative. Hold your position.”

Another half hour passed, but still, Allie waited.

A flash from the far end of the bridge set Allie’s pulse racing. They had escaped.

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Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer